Tuesday, September 30, 2014
pacificnorthwestdoodles:

l0kasenna:

officialnatasharomanoff:

slecnaztemnot:

nmscares:

#DidYouKnow #Deaf #DeafAwareness #education #SignLanguage #advocacy #NMSCares

This is actually sadly relevant. I had a lecture this summer about sign languages and Deaf culture and when I was finished, one hearing girl from the audience stayed behind to ask me some more question.
She asked me: “And your parents use sign language, right?” Like it was the most obvious thing in the world and why is she even asking this, of course my parents must know sign language.
"No… They don’t, actually."
"And how do you communicate, then?"
"Talking?"
"But… isn’t that complicated for you?"
"It is, sometimes."
"They probably didn’t have time for it…" she said. And I haven’t the heart to tell her that my father was offered sign language courses several times, that I offered to teach them some signs and that they always refused.
But I did told her: “It is not that rare. Most of deaf people I know have hearing parents who don’t sign.”
It’s the sad truth. People are willing to pay for surgeries to “repair” their children, but they are not willing to learn something to communicate with them.

i’d like to add onto this with my own personal experience, too. i was born hearing, but as soon as i was diagnosed as HoH, my parents didn’t do anything to learn ASL. they were quick to put me in classes, but they wouldn’t when i suggested to them that they take the classes with me so that we could learn.
i’ve tried to teach my mom how to sign numerous times, but she always says that “you can’t teach an old dog new tricks,” to which i tell her that she can learn, she just doesn’t want to. which is true. neither of my parents want to learn how to sign, but they want me to be able to hear perfectly so they don’t have to repeat themselves.
little do they know that their frustration with me not being able to hear them would be solved if they would just learn how to sign. maybe signing something to me once instead of repeating themselves four times and then getting mad would be more beneficial.

I’m absolutely shocked at this, it’s never crossed my mind that many parents wouldn’t even try to meet their hard of hearing kids halfway.

This includes my parents. “You can lipread and talk, you don’t need to know sign language!”
Lipreading is a chore. Many people ‘forget’ I’m hard of hearing. During conversation folks turn their heads or bodies away. I can’t lipread the back of your head. People try to talk to me across the room, down the hall, or by yelling outside. If my hearing relatives learned ASL, communicating with them would have been so much easier.
Ever since I learned ASL and met other people who could sign communication has been so much easier. I can finally understand people the first time. Other hard of hearing or deaf people I have befriended have told me their families did THE SAME THING with them. Their parents often didn’t learn sign.
Not knowing sign language has made accessing the Deaf community harder because I learned ASL as an adult. As a result, my proficiency is poor and most of the people I learn from are hearing rather than deaf or hard of hearing people.
Many of my friends are also hard of hearing or deaf. Thankfully they’ve been great at helping me get up to speed. Many hearing parents and hearing relatives don’t think ASL is important. Let me tell you—IT IS.

pacificnorthwestdoodles:

l0kasenna:

officialnatasharomanoff:

slecnaztemnot:

nmscares:

#DidYouKnow #Deaf #DeafAwareness #education #SignLanguage #advocacy #NMSCares

This is actually sadly relevant. I had a lecture this summer about sign languages and Deaf culture and when I was finished, one hearing girl from the audience stayed behind to ask me some more question.

She asked me: “And your parents use sign language, right?” Like it was the most obvious thing in the world and why is she even asking this, of course my parents must know sign language.

"No… They don’t, actually."

"And how do you communicate, then?"

"Talking?"

"But… isn’t that complicated for you?"

"It is, sometimes."

"They probably didn’t have time for it…" she said. And I haven’t the heart to tell her that my father was offered sign language courses several times, that I offered to teach them some signs and that they always refused.

But I did told her: “It is not that rare. Most of deaf people I know have hearing parents who don’t sign.”

It’s the sad truth. People are willing to pay for surgeries to “repair” their children, but they are not willing to learn something to communicate with them.

i’d like to add onto this with my own personal experience, too. i was born hearing, but as soon as i was diagnosed as HoH, my parents didn’t do anything to learn ASL. they were quick to put me in classes, but they wouldn’t when i suggested to them that they take the classes with me so that we could learn.

i’ve tried to teach my mom how to sign numerous times, but she always says that “you can’t teach an old dog new tricks,” to which i tell her that she can learn, she just doesn’t want to. which is true. neither of my parents want to learn how to sign, but they want me to be able to hear perfectly so they don’t have to repeat themselves.

little do they know that their frustration with me not being able to hear them would be solved if they would just learn how to sign. maybe signing something to me once instead of repeating themselves four times and then getting mad would be more beneficial.

I’m absolutely shocked at this, it’s never crossed my mind that many parents wouldn’t even try to meet their hard of hearing kids halfway.

This includes my parents. “You can lipread and talk, you don’t need to know sign language!”

Lipreading is a chore. Many people ‘forget’ I’m hard of hearing. During conversation folks turn their heads or bodies away. I can’t lipread the back of your head. People try to talk to me across the room, down the hall, or by yelling outside. If my hearing relatives learned ASL, communicating with them would have been so much easier.

Ever since I learned ASL and met other people who could sign communication has been so much easier. I can finally understand people the first time. Other hard of hearing or deaf people I have befriended have told me their families did THE SAME THING with them. Their parents often didn’t learn sign.

Not knowing sign language has made accessing the Deaf community harder because I learned ASL as an adult. As a result, my proficiency is poor and most of the people I learn from are hearing rather than deaf or hard of hearing people.

Many of my friends are also hard of hearing or deaf. Thankfully they’ve been great at helping me get up to speed. Many hearing parents and hearing relatives don’t think ASL is important. Let me tell you—IT IS.

crystalzelda:

Trying to destigmatize feminism by rendering it entirely toothless and turning it into a soft option by throwing angry women, lesbians, protest activists under the bus is shitty and counter-productive

Stop trying to make feminism palatable to the masses by attempting to reassure people that feminists “are totes not angry hairy bitches who are soooo unreasonable and violent! Feminists love lipstick too! We just wanna get paid a little bit more pwetty please uwu” and won’t picket or scream or be loud and those who do are like, totally crazy and not ~real~ feminists. Yes, yes they are.

That kind of rhetoric isn’t gonna get us far. Sure, we need polished and digestible feminists who make lovely speeches at the UN and feminists who love baking and makeup and have pink blogs about how they’re shaving for women and that’s cool, it absolutely has its place, but so does protesting, angry feminists, women who hate men, women who are loud and angry and express those feelings, women who picket and fight and who aren’t going to say please anymore. Stop throwing those women under the bus in your rush to reassure the masses that feminists aren’t angry bra burners - some of us ARE. And there’s nothing wrong with that. I’ll remind y’all that nobody ever got their owed rights in this world by asking. Battles are won because they are fought.

Professional Editor/Writing Coach: Yours for Cheap!

incidentalpiratess:

Hi, guys. I’ve been writing and editing professionally for more than five years, and I’d love to help you write your way to success. Here’s why you should consider hiring a professional editor or writing coach:

  1. You can instantly boost your grades!
  2. You can get that awesome story out of the slush pile and onto the publisher’s desk.
  3. You can write error-free cover letters, application essays, and persuasive arguments to get what you need.

No writer is too bad or too good to benefit from an editor. And believe it or not, a writing coach or personal editor isn’t super expensive! It’s a very small investment with a huge payoff. To prove it, here are my services and rates:

  • Copyediting (“proofreading”): .01 per word— That’s $6 for an average college essay!
  • Substantive editing (suggesting content/style changes): .02 per word.
  • Writing coaching (helping you become your own editor): $10 per hour via Google Docs, phone, Skype, etc.
  • Ghostwriting: .03+ per word.
  • Bulk projects (e.g. dissertations and novels): contact me!

I got my B.A. from a top 20 university in 2011, and I graduated at the top of my class with a master’s degree in April 2014. I am now pursuing a second master’s degree in English and Creative Writing so I can get my Ph.D. and start teaching. I am a member of Phi Kappa Phi, the oldest all-discipline honor society in the United States. I have tutored countless college and grad students, particularly in AP and APA styles.

I usually take payment over Paypal, but we can work something out if you’re opposed to that. If you’d like my references or writing samples, please send me a message. Let’s get you writing like a boss!

bulletproofteacup:

I can see your whole history in your eyes. You were born with nothing. So you’ve had to struggle and connive and claw your way to power. But true power, the divine right to rule, is something you’re born with. The truth is: they don’t know which one of us is going to be sitting down on that throne, and which of us is going to be bowing down. But I know, and you know..

FOURTEEN YEARS OLD

(Source: korasato)

tywinllannister:

Tudor relationship project requested by trueloveisdelena : Anne and Elizabeth

(Source: queenrhaenyra)

Monday, September 29, 2014

ohromanovas:

I survived because the fire inside me burned brighter than the fire around me - Joshua Graham

(Source: skeleton-leftenent)

the harry potter fanfiction I have obsessively been consuming over the past week or so,

On the Way to Greatness, by mira mirth

The World I Leave Behind, by NES85

this entire series focusing on supporting characters in the Harry Potter universe - Cho Chang, Hannah Abbott, Parvati Patil, Ginny Weasley, and Pansy Parkinson, by dirgewithoutmusic

Then Comes a Mist and a Weeping Rain, by Faith Wood (I also read a lot of her other Harry/Draco stuff, but this is the best imo.) 

I have wrist pain from scrolling down too much as I read Harry Potter fanfiction…

oz-lion:

awkwardsituationist:

storm over the serengeti. photos by nick nichols

reblogging for damp lions

princessashwie:

mildrevolution:

Greek/Roman Inspired Clothing:  2nd dress by Hana Touma, 3rd dress on ebay, 4th dress found here, 5th dress by Madame Gres ,6th dress by Kaufman Franco  , 7th dress by J.Mendel, 8th dress by Madame Gres, 9th dress by Jean Desses, 10th dress by Marchesa, 11th dress by 33Jewls, 12th (last) dress by Samuelle Couture

I need these. All of them!

That’s the only bit of advice I would give the up-and-coming female rappers. You could be as sexy as you want, but just maintain your dignity around these guys.

(Source: fistopherbrown)

dek-says-so:

abbyjean:

Charts from OKCupid, showing how straight women and men rate each other based on ages. For women, the men they find most attractive are roughly their own age. For men, the women they find most attractive are roughly the same age - 20 to 23 - regardless of the age of the man. (538)

Good fucking Christ.